Saturday Snapshot June 15: West Coast Birding

Spent a few days in the Metro Vancouver area last week. Didn’t see a lot of variety of shorebirds, but just catching sight of some Great Blue Herons was gratifying enough.

About half a dozen of them, far from where I was standing. They were peaceful and enjoying themselves until a Bald Eagle headed towards them, in a not-too-friendly manner. What was he thinking? He was alone and there were half a dozen Herons. An altercation soon followed, I could only hear the battle cries from afar but couldn’t snap the photos quick enough. But I can tell you, the Bald Eagle had to fly away subdued.

Here’s the approach. Whatever happened next you’re free to imagine:

Bald Eagle approaching Great Blue HeronsAnother time I got the chance to see a solitary Great Blue Heron up close and personal. It was a mesmerizing moment:

Great Blue HeronTakes flight:

GBH takes flight… landing:

GBH landingAnother day at dusk, above a pond were Swallows mingling in the evening sky. They were flying so swiftly that I could hardly capture them on camera. But after I uploaded the photos, this is what I saw… looks like another mid-air altercation. But since they are of the same species, shall I say this time, a little domestic dispute? Or perhaps just friendly frolicking…

Swallows mid-air disputeHere’s a more serene Canada Geese family outing, a quiet evening swim before bed:

Quiet evening swimDay is done:

Day is done

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Saturday Snapshot is hosted by Melinda of West Metro Mommy. CLICK HERE to see what others have posted.

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More Herons photos here:

Sign of Spring: Nesting

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Published by

Arti

If she’s not birding by the Pond, Arti’s likely watching a movie, reading, or writing a review. Bylines in Asian American Press, Vague Visages, Curator Magazine.

30 thoughts on “Saturday Snapshot June 15: West Coast Birding”

  1. This looks so peaceful — water and birds are great subjects. Love the one where the heron posed for you.

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  2. I think my favorite is of the heron landing, but the swallows is a close second. Do the geese normally swim in a line like that? They look awfully well disciplined. Our mallard babies head off in every different direction, although when Mama gives “that” call, they head right to her. I’m trying to remember if I’ve ever seen mallards swim in a line…they probably have, and I’ve just missed it. (Or don’t remember. That’s always possible!)

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    1. Linda,

      I’ve seen them swim like that, straight line. But also casual too. I’ve also had pictures of the more leisurely swim. Mallards? Actually I haven’t seen any young Mallards swimming with their parents… I’ll have to pay more attention next time. But you know, I’ve got some photos that I’ll post some other time, about more parenting styles.

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  3. I love watching the herons. They don’t look like they can fly, and yet they are so graceful. I think I know what the eagle was thinking…. food! It’s easier to steal a fish someone else had to catch than to catch your own, and eagles can be lazy. And now I’m going to imagine that the herons showed him a thing or two!

    Nice catch on the Swallows squabbling in mid-air.

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    1. Leslie,

      You’re probably right… must be the fish the Heron’s had in their mouth. I was looking away but heard loud bird squabbling sounds, so I too had to imagine.

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  4. How wonderful to know that Harry has a cousin or two in Canada!

    These are unbelievable photos — the clarity is outstanding. And those heron shots — dazzle. That sunset? Oh, I hope you have these made very large and hanging in your home! They are art.

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    1. Jeanie,

      Sunset in Richmond was character… I’d taken a lot of pics. Don’t think I’ll even print any out. Just for looking at on the laptop. Thanks for your kind words! 😉

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    1. Stefanie,

      Too bad I missed the action which only lasted a few seconds. I only heard war cries, and when I turned to look, the eagle was flying away defeated. 😉

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