Saturday Snapshot May 24: Yellow Bird

Here’s another encounter of the ‘ordinary’ yet not so ordinary. A yellow bird is very common for those living in warmer climates. But for me, it’s a rare sighting. I was so excited to see something bright yellow moving among the branches. Can you spot it? Something yellow among branches A better view as I quietly got closer: Getting Closer but just for a short few seconds, and then it was gone, fleeing from a lone paparazzo: Fleeing from a lone paparazzo I followed the yellow bird from tree to tree for well over a half hour. I did not know what kind of bird it was; I did not much care. That would come later when I got home. At that moment, I was too preoccupied with fixing my eyes on it, to whatever perils may come. I was stalking high and low among last year’s flood debris of fallen trees along a damaged landscape, trying not to trip without looking down at my feet.

Finally, a clearing: Caught in a clearingYellow, black and red contrasting fresh green leaves and a pale blue sky in the backdrop, a colourful picture.

Eventually, he seemed to appreciate my tenacity, and rewarded me with a couple of poses: Pose 1   Pose 2   Only after I’d uploaded my photos later and checked the features did I identify what bird it was: The Western Tanager. This one is a male in breeding season. “These birds live in open woods all over the West…” so says the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. They may be common, but this one is unique because it’s the only one I’ve seen. That makes it special for me.

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Saturday Snapshot is hosted by West Metro Mommy Reads. Click Here to see what others have posted.

Photos in this post taken by Arti of Ripple Effects, 2014. Please DO NOT COPY or Reblog.

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Published by

Arti

If she’s not birding by the Pond, Arti’s likely watching a movie, reading, or writing a review. Bylines in Asian American Press, Vague Visages, Curator Magazine.

41 thoughts on “Saturday Snapshot May 24: Yellow Bird”

    1. Thanks Cathy. Umm… could be because you see them so often, just outside your kitchen window, you wouldn’t take their photos. This one was special to me because it’s so ‘rare’, for me anyway. 😉

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  1. Such gorgeous photos! I love the way you presented them in this post, taking us along with you as you got closer and closer, ending with the final beautiful shot. This must have been an amazing experience for you, especially since you were able to capture such delightful photos through your tenacity.

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  2. What a show off! (the bird) He was posing. Your patience was rewarded with that last shot. Fantastic! I am going to get a photo of the satanic robin that has been tormenting me. I’m inspired! LOL!

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    1. Michelle,

      I’m sure you have more colourful species down in OK than us here in Alberta. Go look for them. I’d love to see your photos! 😉

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      1. I am in awe of the egrets and pelicans. I don’t know much about the small birds, but I do have a pair of cardinals and many robins in my back yard.

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    1. Joy,

      Yes, I was much gratified. Mind you, I didn’t know I got a good photo until I went home and uploaded them. So, it was quite a surprise.

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    1. Irene,

      Thanks. It was tricky to climb and step over fallen trees and rocks and stones while keeping my eyes up to follow a flight path. 😉

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  3. I know how exciting it is to find a new bird, this one is especially gorgeous, and you did a great job of being tenacious, and were so well rewarded. It’s certainly a bird you’ll remember, and I’m sure you’ll see more.

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    1. Louise,

      Yes, hopefully this year I’ll have the chance to see more. I love yellow birds. Last year I saw a Baltimore Oriole and Goldfinch. They may be common in other areas south or east of us, but for me, they were rare sightings. Hope I can see them again this summer.

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  4. Oh, that last photo! I hope you have it enlarged into something very big and beautiful. It’s gorgeous — and the photo is wonderful — perfect clarity, dazzling color, and as you noted, a genuine pose. Of course he posed. He knew he had nothing to fear from you. I love this. Intensely.

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    1. Jeanie,

      Thanks so much for your kind words. And yes, I’d like to think that was what’s on his mind: gratifying me by posing. Although, I kind of speculate that maybe he was as curious about me than I was about him. Just that he didn’t have a camera with him. 😉

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  5. Well, you got much better photos than I did with my mystery yellow bird. Such a pretty fellow with that bright cap. Thanks for the bird ID link, by the way. I poked around a bit but am still not sure about the ID.

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    1. I know it’s hard to ID an unfamiliar bird. They can look very similar. Just by looking at your pics I really can’t tell much details. Maybe you can send your pics to the website or Cornell Lab of Ornithology (link in my post).

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      1. Thanks to the site you listed, I think I narrowed it down to “lesser goldfinch” and a couple of other commenters confirmed! The little guy has been back, munching on the verbena and, sadly, a bee.

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  6. Great shot! So nice of him to come out into the open. I know what you mean about the treacherous landscape. Many times I’ve stepped in holes and tripped over fallen branches. But I understand the excitement of finding – and stalking – a new bird.

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    1. This used to be a nice park area with picnic tables and lots of beautiful trees. I’d seen bald eagles on them and in the river, Mallards, Goldeneye, Mergansers, and a Pelican once. But now it’s all ruined by last year’s flood. It’s sad just to look at the landscape there now but sighting the birds always bring new hope of renewal.

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  7. I recognized him as a tananger,but only from photos. I’ve never seen one myself. Your tenacity certainly was rewarded. I’ve learned over the years that certain birds are more accepting of humans than others (or of other birds, for that matter). And some, who’ve not experienced humans, haven’t learned to be afraid. Whatever was in his little birdie mind, we’ll hope you come across many more that allow you to “capture” them in this way!

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    1. Linda,

      The pleasure and thrills of birding is in the search and ‘capturing’ and ID of them. Actually, not much tenacity is required because it’s pure pleasure. I wrote the narrative imagining what the bird might think. Maybe it was just by chance he came by me, or maybe, he was thinking I was scouting for a mag cover or casting a new movie. 🙂

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    1. Yes, that’s what I like to think, that he came near me to draw my attention, knowing I had a camera on hand… possible celeb. shot to go viral. He wished. 😉

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    1. Stefanie,

      I keep track with my photos of them which I upload on my laptop. I don’t store them online through Flickr, don’t do FB or any other photo sites, so it’s a huge collection right in my computer. Not a good idea I know. But I do back up on an external drive.

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