Saturday Snapshot June 27: The Busy Beaver

It is on the face of our 5-cent coin, an emblem of Canada. And thanks to conservation and the lack of demand in the pelt hat, the Beaver – at one time endangered – is now safe in numbers.

the nickel

However, we seldom see one, definitely not an everyday sighting. As for me, I’ve never seen one on land like the image on the coin, busy with its chore. But they are around; surely we can see the aftermath they leave behind. Here are evidences of their presence:

Work of a Beaver's

Beaver's aftermath

That’s why we have these:

Wired protections

I’ve had the chance of seeing a beaver recently at a pond, taking a break from its busy schedule:

The Pond

 

Beaver in the pond

Sure looks like a bear is swimming towards you:

Beaver 3

Beaver 1

A closer look and you can see its long and robust body:

Beaver

yet agile, diving in and speeds away underwater:

Diving

But what I find interesting are the ripples it makes. Look back at the above photos and below:

The Beaver Close-up

 

More Ripples

 

Ripples 3

 

Ripples

Or is it just me, watching out for ripples everywhere?

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Saturday Snapshot is hosted by West Metro Mommy Reads. CLICK HERE to see what others have posted.

ALL PHOTOS TAKEN BY ARTI OF RIPPLE EFFECTS

DO NOT COPY OR REBLOG

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Published by

Arti

If she’s not birding by the Pond, Arti’s likely watching a movie, reading, or writing a review. Bylines in Asian American Press, Vague Visages, Curator Magazine.

21 thoughts on “Saturday Snapshot June 27: The Busy Beaver”

  1. Aren’t they sleek and handsome? And busy, too — that old expression about “busy as a beaver” is grounded in reality.

    Your photos are delightful. It’s such fun to see creatures that aren’t at all a part of my world. That may be my fault, though. This article makes clear that the beavers are here, if only I would get out and look.

    The second paragraph has some interesting details about beavers’ habits. You may find some new tell-tale signs of the presence to look for.

    Happy day!

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    1. Linda,

      Do let me know if you see one in your neck of the woods. Just wonder how, if any, they could be different from our beavers. And as far as busyness goes, I seldom see them at work. Every time I spotted one it was swimming leisurely in the pond. 😉

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  2. Thanks Arti, we have beaver along the Cherry Creek Trail in Denver, CO and the parks and recreation people are always trying to relocate them upstream. they can make these great dams in one night, and then the dam floods the bike trails. For me, it is worth it just to have them and see nature in a large city — however, the parks and rec MUST put wire around the important trees which do have an important purpose to help shade the stream. ah, to achieve balance is key.

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    1. Yes, I guess that’s the right word for everything: balance. And, just curious since you get to see beavers too in CO, I’m wondering why it’s Canada’s emblem, since it’s definitely not unique only in Canada.

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  3. Very nice variety of ripples! I don’t think I’ve ever seen a beaver in person. For all those chewed and downed tree branches, do the beavers use them? Or do they just like chewing them?

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    1. nikkipolani,

      LOL, like babies teething, just to chew on something. Actually, I think they might use some of them to build their ‘dams’. I don’t know for sure.

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  4. I never noticed the beaver was on the nickel! And indeed — quite wonderful ripples! But then, I always find wonderful ripples — and wonderful images — here.

    Did you know Tamara is doing her Paris in July thing again at Thyme for Tea?Any French films to share over there?

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    1. Yes, Jeanie, the next time you come to Canada, save a few nickels. Now that the penny has become obsolete, I wonder how long will the nickel last.

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  5. What a perfect ripple post from you. I’ve never seen a beaver, but would love to one day. He looks so purposeful swimming- perhaps he’s enjoying his ripples too?

    Like

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