Saturday Snapshots July 21

Once again, Saturday Snapshots framed by a Paris in July backdrop…

I was pleasantly surprised to find the open space outside the Louvre being used not only for tourist line-ups but as a spot for a family outing.

Dad can keep an eye on Sis biking, while Mom gets baby ready for a video shoot.

And Li’l Bro rides into the sunset.

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Saturday Snapshot hosted by Alyce of At Home With Books, Paris In July at BookBath and Thyme for Tea.

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Published by

Arti

If she’s not birding by the Pond, Arti’s likely watching a movie, reading, or writing a review. Bylines in Asian American Press, Vague Visages, Curator Magazine.

40 thoughts on “Saturday Snapshots July 21”

  1. It’s been a looooooong time since I visited Paris. The glass pyramid wasn’t even built yet! Thanks for taking me on a tour. Beautiful photos and interesting and informative commentary, as always!

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    1. Thanks for joining me on this virtual tour on this and previous posts for Paris in July. Hope you’ll go back in real time one of these days. 😉

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    1. The Vagabond Baker:

      Welcome! I’ve enjoyed your wonderful blog too… and how I admire you can actually be a vagabond baker, literally. 😉

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  2. I like the little lad on his scooter. The French seem to be very enthusiastic about walking, jogging, cycling, scooting, skating etc in public places, and with families and groups of friends. By the way, thanks for dropping by my post.

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    1. Yes, I’d taken a few more of photos of this family, but more identifiable … that’s why I chose not to publish them here. The little guy was a natural. I’ve enjoyed your Book Trunk posts, always so informative. Thanks for stopping by!

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    1. It certainly would have been quite different, other than the cultural nourishment. Like recently there’s a book comparing what kids eat in the U.S. and in France, where there are more varieties and less junk food.

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    1. Louise,

      As I was replying Alyce above, it definitely would be quite a different experience. Thanks for stopping by and leaving your comment. 😉

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    1. Paulita,

      It was a joy watching him ride his scooter. He was only about 3 yrs. old. Thanks for the link to your blog. I was there earlier today and left a comment. You sure have captured some good reasons for loving Paris. 😉

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    1. Leslie,

      I have to say though that the glass pyramids look a bit out-of-place there. But, yes, the old and the new can stand together, good contrast of architectural icons.

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  3. I don’t think I’ve ever been into the Louvre – queues too big the last time I was in Paris, but it’s lovely to see the building, and the child on the scooter is a delight.

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    1. Litlove,

      The line-up may be long but it moved quite quickly the last time I was there … so hopefully if you’re there again, you’ll have the time to go in. It’s really worth the wait.

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  4. I just finished reading all your last posts and I enjoyed them all. We are back home for a while and now that the Tour de France is finished I am returning to my computer. I have Tour de France withdrawals though and I am melancholy at the thought of not seeing pictures of France for a while. But there are many pictures of Paris and France in blog land like on your lovely blog, so it helps.
    We were in that large courtyard in May 2011 and being early evening it was almost deserted. I remember going to the Louvre with my mother while growing up in Paris – there were not many tourists then. I also learned how to skate in the Louvre gardens and fell many times!

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    1. Vagabonde,

      “Tour de France withdrawals”… LOL. Hope the Olympics can do some remedy. Are you all geared up for it? And thanks for sharing this tidbit of your childhood days in Paris. So these children are actually doing what you would have done growing up in Paris. How cool is that! I can’t imagine learning to skate, or ride the bike, right in the courtyard of the Louvre. What a wonderful childhood it must have been, to be nurtured in so rich a culture. Thanks for sharing!

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