Midnight’s Children Read-A-Long

Midnight’s Children Read-Along has begun. Here are the post to:
Midnight’s Children Read-Along Begins
Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie, Book One
Midnight’s Children Book Two (Part A: up to ‘Alpha and Omega’) 
Midnight’s Children Read-Along Book Two Part B
Midnight’s Children: Book Three

On Dec. 29 of last year, I posted “Year End Tally and 2012 Outlook“, and I thought that would be it. The two challenges I’ve taken up for this year, the Graham Greene and the Ireland Reading, would be sufficient in lieu of any new year’s resolutions. Further, there will always be movie reviews and other choices in reading on the spur of the moment.

Along came the new year and another opportunity. Thanks to Mrs. B of The Literary Stew, who suggested to me a read-a-long of Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, I gladly accepted the idea. We’re excited that Bellezza of Dolce Bellezza and Colleen of Books in the City will also be joining us. I know that on Bellezza’s blog, she has a few who have shown interest. You’re invited to hop on as well.

Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children won the 1981 Booker Prize. In 1993, it was awarded the Booker of the Bookers trophy, the best novel to have won the Booker Prize for Fiction in the Award’s 25-year history. I admit I haven’t read any Rushdie before, so I just thought this would be a good one to start. Do click on the link above to Booker’s website for the synopsis and bio.

Another major reason for my interest in reading it this year is that its film adaptation is currently in post-production. Acclaimed Canadian director Deepa Mehta (Water, 2005) is at the helm of the production. Rushdie is closely involved in the process with Mehta in condensing his novel into 130 pages of screenplay. Filming has already been completed in Sri Lanka. According to IMDb, it will be released this fall.

My copy is the 25th Anniversary Edition. It has 533 pages. Considering the dense writing and the historical backdrop of the novel, it sounds like a book that calls for reading camaraderie and dialogue. Also, we’ve decided to take it slow. By so doing, we can also pursue other readings or blogging activities while doing this.

So here’s our plan. The novel is divided into 3 sections, with the middle the longest, so we’ll split it in two. We’ll begin reading in March. One month for each part. Review posts are to be posted according to the following schedule:

March 31 — Book One
April 30   — Book Two (Part A ending with ‘Alpha and Omega’)
May 31    —  Book Two (Part B starting with ‘The Kolynos Kid’)
June 30   — Book Three

You’re welcome to join us in this slow read. Just indicate in the comment section and leave a link. 

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And to everyone, Happy Reading in 2012!

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Published by

Arti

If she’s not birding by the Pond, Arti’s likely watching a movie, reading, or writing a review. Bylines in Asian American Press, Vague Visages, Curator Magazine.

18 thoughts on “Midnight’s Children Read-A-Long”

  1. I read Rushdie for the first time last year and very much enjoyed him! I hope you have a wonderful experience.

    .
    litlove,

    I’m so glad to hear this from you. I hope the 500+ pages won’t bog me down. 🙂

    Arti

    Like

  2. What an excellent idea! I tried to read Midnight’s Children a long time ago, but couldn’t get through it. My reading tastes and style has changed since then, so this might be a good opportunity to try again. Put me down!

    .
    Deborah,

    I’m so glad you’re in! I hope we can all go through it this time. I look forward to your sharing as we read along. Thanks for joining!

    Arti

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  3. This is the book that made me a fan of Mr. Rushdie for life. If there’s a movie coming out, then it is most definitely time for a re-read. My track record with formal reads is not great, but i’m willing to give it a go if you’ll have me. Thanks for the oppportunity!

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    ds,

    I’m so excited that you can join us! I’m the one who’s inexperienced here, haven’t read any of Rushdie’s books. Glad to hear that this is the book that made you “a fan of Mr. Rushdie for life.” I look forward to your insights. Thanks for your participation! And, wouldn’t it be fantastic if we could go to see the film’s premiere!? (I’ve a hunch that it’ll be at the TIFF this Sept.)

    Arti

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  4. “…it sounds like a book that calls for reading camaraderie and dialogue.” I’m beginning to get that idea! All the more reason to be glad there’s a group of us.

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    Bellezza,

    Yes, and we’ve to wait till March. Oh well, a ‘false start’ is definitely excusable. 🙂 Thanks for your support and participation!

    Arti

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  5. I saw this book on my son-in-law’s shelf last Monday and wondered about it – it is long though and I have 4 or 5 books started already. I did read 7 books while being sick – most of them light reading because my mind was stuffy – mystery books by A. Christie and also books by Colette (in French.) I’ll look forward to reading your comments on Midnight’s Children. We did borrow a book from my son-in-law’s shelf called “Shallow Graves in Siberia” by Michael Krupa. The author was arrested in Poland and sent to the Lubianka prison then the terrible Pechora Gulag. Somehow he escaped and walked to freedom from Siberia to Afghanistan – so I’ll read that next.

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    Vagabonde,

    I’m curious to know what your SIL thinks about the book, if he’s read it. I’d be interested too to read about your views on the books you’ve mentioned… all leading us to worlds which we know so little.

    Arti

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  6. So glad we organized this read-a-long. Here’s hoping we end up loving this book.

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    Mrs. B,

    Thanks for the start-up. Also, from the comments, looks like it’s a lot of readers’ favorite. Looking forward to reading and posting about it.

    Arti

    Like

  7. I purchased a copy of Midnight’s Children today as well as a copy of The Paris Wife. I read the first lines of MC and found it very readable. So I’m inspired to try group reading again; I’ve only attempted the read-along once — about two years ago now — and though I really wanted to read the book, other commitments kept me from finishing. Your reading timeline sounds spacious and do-able.

    Janell

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    Janell,

    Welcome to the read-a-long! As a slow reader myself, there’s really no other ways to read MC but to read it slowly. Glad the extended timeline can fit into your schedule. Looking forward to our discussions!

    Arti

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  8. Interesting! I’m so glad they are involving Rushdie in the screenplay. Doesn’t always happen and I think it’s often better when it does!

    .
    And the two of them, writer and director, had a special session at the TIFF last year. I was not fortunate enough to get a ticket to hear them, even though I was in Toronto at that time.

    A.

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  9. Hi Arti, is the Read-a-Long open to all? I don’t have a website/blog but would love to join ya’ll. I have not been able to read Salman Rushdie in the past-it seemed so intellectual as to be beyond my grasp-but I am on an Indian/Pakistan history kick and have heard this is one of his best.

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    Leah,

    You’re most welcome! The Read-A-Long is open to all, not just bloggers. I’m so excited that you can join us. I’ll have an intro post at the beginning of March. You could follow the scheduled reading. At the end of each month, you’re welcome to stop by for links to all reviews. You can then share your view as comments in our posts. This is a new experience for me too, so just hope it’ll work out fine. Thanks again for your participation!

    Arti

    Like

  10. I am really looking forward to the Read A Long – I started and read about 1/2 the book last year and am looking forward to getting back to it – especially with a group!

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    booksnyc,

    Welcome and yes, I’m excited that what started as a spark from one is now growing into a group eager to begin! Thanks for joining and let’s support each other to finish it this time! 😉

    Arti

    Like

  11. I read this book last year and enjoyed it quite a bit. Won’t say it is my favorite Rushdie though. Hope you enjoy the book and the readathon.

    .
    Nish,

    You’re welcome to check back while we’re at it and share your thoughts. Thanks for your comment.

    Arti

    Like

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