Saturday Snapshot Oct. 27: Birds in the Snow

Yes, it’s snow for us all this week. A strong taste of early winter. But the birds don’t seem to mind. Here they are, Robins hanging out:

This is the attraction… juicy fruits:

But some are just born to work:

With so much food around, I’d rather be a slacker:

Now, roll out those lazy, hazy, crazy days of winter…

***

Thanks to Alyce of At Home With Books for hosting Saturday Snapshot.

Published by

Arti

If she’s not birding by the Pond, Arti’s likely watching a movie, reading, or writing a review. Bylines in Asian American Press, Vague Visages, Curator Magazine.

59 thoughts on “Saturday Snapshot Oct. 27: Birds in the Snow”

    1. From afar, there wasn’t too much contrast because there was snow on the ground and an overcast sky. But as I came closer to the tree and shot the photos then I’d really appreciated the red berries.

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    1. Sim,

      I didn’t create it… the background was snow and grey overcast sky. That’s why there wasn’t any colour, like, bland. I just gave it a bit more exposure so we can see better. It was a miserably cold and dull day. But after I saw the birds and taken all these photos, it really brightened up. 😉

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  1. Very pretty, Arti. We used to have a flowering crab apple that had red berries just like the one in these shots. The squirrels and birds loved the berries!

    The sun is shining here, but it was cold when we woke up. 27 degrees (F). I wonder when we’ll see our first snowflake…

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    1. Les,

      That’s exactly it, the Spring Snow Crabapple which is ornamental, profuse white flowers in the summer, bed berries in the fall. But this is the first time I see so many Robins on one tree. And, we went through a heavy snow warning earlier this week, early winter I’m afraid.

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  2. These pictures are beautiful – I love how the leaves complement the red in the Robin. The snow adds an element of stillness to the pictures.

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    1. Colleen,

      It looked still in the photos. But you know earlier there was like a snow storm almost, blowing and heavy snow. But I’m glad the birds take it in stride.

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    1. Kaye,

      Yes, in my own photo files I called that one The Fat Bird. But of course, it’s just fluffed up to brace against the cold I think. But she or he does look complacent, a real slacker. I didn’t see it move a bit.

      Like

    1. Kim,

      It’s more like winter to me… with all the whites. Deep snow on the ground and grey, heavy overcast sky that guaranteed more snow to come.

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  3. How wonderful to see the robins. I’m sure I’ve said they’re a reminder of my childhood – I always smile when I see them. Do they stay there all winter? Or migrate? We always “lost them” in Iowa winters. They’d disappear for a few months and then come back as a first sign of spring.

    No question they’re cold. Look how that last one is fluffed up! Thanks for these wonderful photos – I’m just smiling.

    I’m up in Kansas City at my aunt’s just now. I’m leaving tomorrow and starting a relatively leisurely journey home through Kansas and Oklahoma. West to Kansas first, then south – we’ll see how things go. There’s no snow scheduled here yet, thank goodness. I’m enjoying the cold (29 this morning) but I’m not equipped for driving in snow.

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    1. Linda,

      I’m afraid I could only spot Robins. So that Downy Woodpecker was a pleasant surprise. How wonderful that you got a chance to travel a bit, with Princess I suppose? I trust the weather down there is still quite warm, compared to what we’re having. And, will you see snow down there? Maybe the rare occasion? I look forward to seeing your photos and travelogue on your blog. Enjoy the rest of your trip!

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  4. We had the first snow of the season today as well. Far too early for the UK Midlands. What is worse, we didn’t have such wonderful birds to brighten the experience. I have made sure that the feeders are all topped up though. Just because I don’t see them doesn’t mean they’re not around.

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    1. Alex,

      I was thinking of putting a feeder there but this tree seems to be a good source of food. And snow is heavy here… more than a foot deep. I hope though that it’ll warm up a bit later in Nov. You never know, we usually get pretty good late fall weather. Now is below seasonal average.

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  5. That’s a great shot. I love the way the robins get together in large winter flocks and feast on the berries.

    The only good thing about birding in the winter is it’s easier to see the birds with no leaves on the trees!

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    1. Leslie,

      You’re right about that… I sure can see them better on bare branches. But then again, it’ll get too cold (for me, not for them) to step outside to take pictures. 😉

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      1. I would tell you that you’ll get used to it, but I’d be lying! I was out for 3 hours this morning at 32F and I’m still chilled. And the only good photo I got was a Hairy Woodpecker. Most of the birds were hiding, probably shivering, in the tall grass.

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    1. Lisa,

      Thanks. Actually there’s really nothing in the background… plain white snow and overcast dull sky. So the red berries and Robins are real good contrast. Thanks for stopping by and leaving your comment.

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    1. They did blend in well. At first I couldn’t see the birds until I looked closer and then I found there wasn’t just one or two, but a few more.

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    1. Brona,

      Actually in reality they were quite bland, the sky was grey the ground was white. Glad they turned out well. Thanks for your comment. 😉

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  6. Those shots of the berries and the robins are so colourful and cheery, despite the winter temps. I love your woodpecker photo too- I don’t think I’ve ever seen one, or heard one, I’d love to-all those Woody Woodpecker cartoons as a kid I think.

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    1. Louise,

      The Downy Woodpecker is quite common here. I’ve seen it several times now in my neighborhood. Woody is a Pileated Woodpecker, I see them less often. But yes, don’t you still remember Woody’s call? I loved to see that show too, and still remember the artist drawing Woody out.

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    1. I read from a website that they don’t need to, although some still do, more male than female. So I’ll still be seeing Robins in my areas even in our deep, cold winter.

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  7. If you do Christmas, I hope you make one of these your holiday card. I simply gasped when I saw them, adoring the beautiful birds and the bright berries. Bravo! Your bird watching is paying off! Now they pose!

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    1. Hi Michelle,

      Thanks for stopping by and leaving your comment. The birds are a welcome sight, but certainly not the weather. Just wondering what kinds of birds do you usually see in OK?

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  8. Oh, my gosh…what gorgeous photos! The birds and berries against the white background are so stark and beautiful! Hard to imagine you have snow already, but I guess there will be some here in the US this week, too.

    Sue

    Book By Book

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    1. Sue,

      We’re up north, in Calgary, Alberta, and usually get our first snow come Halloween. But this year seems to be the start of an early winter, which I dread even after decades of living here. 😉

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  9. Gorgeous photos. Your robins stay in the winter? Ours go south to warmer climes, I haven’t seen one for more than a month. We got some snow last week but the ground hasn’t frozen yet so it melted right away. It’s only a matter of time before it does stick!

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    1. Stefanie,

      They’re still here. And since I’ve only started birdwatching for two months, I can’t answer your question about Robins migrating. I need to pay attention to them through the winter. However, I did find some info about them, a Canadian website actually, stating that they do stay here, and that the kind of crabapple trees in this photo (actually it’s a tree in my backyard, called the Spring Snow Crabapple, I remember you have one planted in your garden too) are best food for them in the winter. But it’s certainly interesting that they stay up here in the cold north, while yours migrate further south.

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  10. How lovely. I came to link to Anna Karenina and found this instead. These winter berry images are feast to eyes and birds alike. Brrrr.

    I’ll link later. Thanks for hosting AK.

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    1. Janell,

      The final wrap-up post is Nov. 15. But I’d love to read your thoughts. Thanks so much for reading along with me. I’ve enjoyed the sharing and camaraderie. 🙂

      Like

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